Casino Blackjack: Rules of the Game

The basic premise of the game is that you want to have a hand value that is closer to 21 than that of the dealer, without going over Ok this one's an extremely rare variation which I doubt you will see in any casinos today but I thought I'd mention. Comprehensive, clear, easy to read and understand and thorough. In fact, that is what the casino is counting on! This option is only available on the player's two-card starting hand.

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How to Play

Never play for extended periods of time without taking a break, getting a drink of water, eating a snack, or simply stretch your legs. Beware the "hot" and "cold" myth. Don't feel pressure to tip.

You should only tip the dealer if you feel like tipping. Unless dealers are doing something dishonest -- and there are hundreds of cameras in the sky to make sure they're not -- they can't do anything that will affect your play. Five decks are plenty. A 6- or 8- deck game is slightly more disadvantageous to a player 10ths of a percent but there's more potential for a player to be cheated in a handheld single-deck game although this rarely happens at reputable casinos.

Unless you're counting, don't worry about the shuffle. For a professional player, an automatic shuffler makes tracking specific packets of cards or specific cards through a shuffle theoretically impossible. Most handheld shuffles are not perfectly random and therefore can be beaten by simulating the shuffle on a computer and then devising a system to exploit their non-random nature. All seats at the table are the same. Surprisingly, cards have no preference for particular seats. Only superstitious people do.

If you are looking to play from the comfort of your home, you can visit our online blackjack or live dealer blackjack sections for further resources. Hopefully I've covered just about everything you need. But if you have other questions, feel free to post a reply at the bottom of the page. Our free blackjack game lets you play at your pace, and the Strategy Coach provides instant feedback on the best strategy. To find the best strategy, use our most popular resource: The Blackjack Strategy Engine provides free strategy charts that are optimized for your exact rules.

If you prefer a plastic card that you can take to the table with you, we have those too: Blackjack Basic Strategy Cards. The original version of this explanation of the rules of blackjack has a very long history here at BlackjackInfo.

I created and published it here sometime in It was widely copied by other sites, and it has appeared without my permission on literally hundreds of sites over the years. When I relaunched BlackjackInfo with a new mobile-friendly design in , I took the opportunity to write this all-new version. Hmmm seems I have been making some bad calls for years now, I thought splitting tens against anything but an ace or 10 was a good move: If a player decides to stand on 15 for whatever reason and the dealer has 16, must the dealer still draw another card since it is less than 17?

Is there any significance in blackjack when you have a black jack paired with a black ace, same suit? The question came up on the multiple choice question on Millionaire. I guessed 16 but the answer was 32??? In playing 21 with one deck off cards aND two people playing, in playing Blackjack with one deck of cards and two people playing what is the most black jack show up.

Ken, This may not be the most appropriate page to post this, but let me explain the situation. I aspire to hopefully gather a group of trustworthy guys together to form a blackjack team. Team play is complicated and far more involved than a group of friends pooling resources. There is not much published on team play. The following book may be helpful. The strategy does not change, but the player is worse off by around 0.

As the dealer I get up to Can the dealer chose to stay and take the chips bet from player on the left. But pay the player on the right? His rules are fixed. He must hit until he has 17 or higher, and then he must stand. Even if all the players at the table have 18, the dealer must stand if he ends up with a Most casinos now deal games with an extra rule about soft This is covered in detail in the article above.

I have a question. I signed up on an online casino and I was getting ready to play blackjack for real money and I asked the live chat help person how many decks were being used and she said 24 decks.

Casinos, both online and land-based, can deal the game pretty much any way they like, including increasing the number of decks to a ridiculous 24! Fortunately, once you get to 8 decks, the game does not get much worse for the player by adding even more decks. Eight decks is the most typically seen in brick-and-mortar casinos, but in most jurisdictions, land-based or online, there is no legal requirement for any specific number of decks. Is there any standard in the way a dealer deals from the deck?

You are describing a CSM continuous shuffle machine , where after each hand the dealer immediately puts the used cards back into the shuffler. As you note, this eliminates the ability to count cards, or to even observe a useful bias. Since used cards can return into play immediately, the penetration is effectively zero.

These machines have spread widely. The only recourse is to see if your casino also still offers regular games either hand-shuffled, or machine-shuffled but with a normal discard tray. If not, voice your discontent and look elsewhere. Should I be able to ask a casino to provide a copy of their rules? I assume you are talking about online casinos. I didnt catch it at first but sure enough when I drew another card I busted.

This particular game would not count both my Aces as one. Is this ever done at a casino? Who knows what else they are doing wrong! To answer your question, no, this is never done at any casino I have visited. Is this a good bet? What is the house percentage? Yes, there are outstanding opportunities afforded by some sidebets under some circumstances, but if you are able to figure out how to beat them, you no longer need to ask about them. So, the answer to that question is always no.

I read the following in the Casino Verite Software: Can you help me with this? There you can find: This works because of the unbalanced nature of the count. Or do I need to count them equally? Treat them independently, and reassess after each drawn card changes the hand. Here are some examples: You will draw each of those hands about once every hands or so. As to whether or not to double, 9,3 is a hard 12 and should certainly never be doubled.

Also against a dealer 4 in some 1 and 2 deck games. See the Strategy Engine for accurate advice for any game. I assume you are asking about accessing the charts on your smartphone in the casino. I do not recommend that. In the US, there are laws prohibiting the use of devices in gambling.

Most of these laws are based on the Nevada version, which is written in a way that it could be interpreted to mean even something as harmless as looking up a strategy. If you want access to the strategy in the casino, get a plastic card instead. The shoe game will be easier for a visually impaired player, because both the other players and the dealer have full access to the needed information about the hands.

I have played at the table on many occasions with blind players, and the dealer has always assisted by verbally providing the details of the hand. Awesome page, One question..

Is this a standard rule? Need to be sure which is the standard and which is the exception… Thanks. I have seen the behavior you describe in online casinos, but I have never seen it dealt that way in any land-based casino. There, the dealer always deals a card to the first split hand, finishes that hand, and then deals a card to the second split hand and begins it. I was in Cancun in a casino and in one hand I had 2 Aces against dealer King. I split the 2 Aces and I,ve got Queens on both aces but the dealer draw a card that was an Ace and said that he won since he had blackjack and I only had Blackjack is 21 in the first two cards, and it beats a total of 21, even the case of splitting and getting two hands that look like blackjack.

They are just 21s. But when the dealer does not take a hole card and all bets are subject to losing to a potential dealer blackjack , you should not double or split against a dealer ten or ace because of this. Hi, can please anyone help me with an answer.

Do casinos now change the deck of cards after every game or not? Because I heard lot of people saying that now it is impossible to memorise cards that are still in the game. But I am not sure if this is due to change or because casino use so many decks at once I read above that there are 8 decks in the game.

I think what you are trying to describe are continuous shuffle machines CSMs , which allow the dealer to put the discards back into the machine immediately instead of waiting until the shuffled shoe is completed. The use of a CSM does eliminate the ability to count cards. Fortunately, there are still plenty of games available in most areas that do not use CSMs. The difference is that you must draw a card to your total of 9, whether you double or not. Standing is not an option. With A8 instead, you already have a completed solid hand of Basic strategy will reduce the house edge, but not eliminate it.

In typical games, your long-run expectation will be to lose around half a percent of your total action. Yes, tipping the dealer is common. If a dealer is pleasant, I like to tip a small amount on the hand after I get blackjack, but even then I skip some hands.

It was a cool list. Despite the title, it covered many unusual rule variations. Understand the rules here, and then visit the Strategy Engine to see the appropriate plays. Practice with the Trainer. Are you asking about a rule that pays you for having 5 cards and not busting? The free Windows software at this site will analyze these rules for you, including optimal strategy and the effect on the game.

Free BJ Combinatorial Software. Tell me about the best place to sit at a table in Vegas. I have heard that you do not want to be on the end. If you are a basic strategy player, it makes no difference where you sit.

If you are a card counter, you can see an extra few cards before you play your hand by sitting at the end, which helps a small bit. For that reason, many players avoid it. When the dealer has a 2 through 6 up, they must draw another card except A6 depending on the table rules.

As a result, the dealer busts more often with those upcards. This is why standing on player totals of is the best play against the small dealer upcards. As for 12v2 and 12v3, those are just exceptions you have to remember. No, pairs and soft hands are completely different. Use the Strategy Engine to see how to play any situation. Any thoughts on this difference? It is likely that you saw players doubling A7v2, not just hitting it. Hitting would simply be a mistake, as it is the third best way to play the hand.

The choice of whether to stand or double with A7v2 is a close one. In fact, correct basic strategy for that hand depends on whether the dealer hits or stands on soft 17s. The strategy engine takes all this into account when creating an accurate strategy chart for you. In S17 games, you should stand. In H17 games, you should double. Except in single deck. Can a person win under those rules? I quit playing there. I generally play at the Indian Casinos in Calif.

Those rules are definitely tough. Even if it is a 2-deck game, the starting house edge in that game is still 0. Rules of the Game. You must only touch the cards with one hand. If you are a poker player, this can take some effort to break old habits! You must keep the cards over the table. Don't pull them close to your body. Any cards that the dealer subsequently deals to your hand are left on the table, not added to the cards you are holding. Part 6 — Playing at the Casino Basics Choosing a Table at the Casino If you are new to the game, there are a few items you should notice when looking for a game… The most important item is the sign declaring betting limits.

Next, take a look at how the game is being dealt. There are two different dealing styles: The dealer distributes cards from a dealing shoe and the player cards are all dealt face-up. These games typically use 6 or 8 decks of cards. The rules are simple, the play is thrilling, and there is opportunity for high strategy. In fact, for the expert player who mathematically plays a perfect game and is able to count cards, the odds are sometimes in that player's favor to win.

But even for the casual participant who plays a reasonably good game, the casino odds are less, making Blackjack one of the most attractive casino games for the player.

Today, Blackjack is the one card game that can be found in every American gambling casino. As a popular home game, it is played with slightly different rules. In the casino version, the house is the dealer a "permanent bank". In casino play, the dealer remains standing, and the players are seated.

The dealer is in charge of running all aspects of the game, from shuffling and dealing the cards to handling all bets. In the home game, all of the players have the opportunity to be the dealer a "changing bank". The standard card pack is used, but in most casinos several decks of cards are shuffled together. The six-deck game cards is the most popular.

In addition, the dealer uses a blank plastic card, which is never dealt, but is placed toward the bottom of the pack to indicate when it will be time for the cards to be reshuffled. When four or more decks are used, they are dealt from a shoe a box that allows the dealer to remove cards one at a time, face down, without actually holding one or more packs.

Each participant attempts to beat the dealer by getting a count as close to 21 as possible, without going over It is up to each individual player if an ace is worth 1 or Face cards are 10 and any other card is its pip value.

Before the deal begins, each player places a bet, in chips, in front of him in the designated area. The dealer thoroughly shuffles portions of the pack until all the cards have been mixed and combined. He designates one of the players to cut, and the plastic insert card is placed so that the last 60 to 75 cards or so will not be used. Not dealing to the bottom of all the cards makes it more difficult for professional card counters to operate effectively.

When all the players have placed their bets, the dealer gives one card face up to each player in rotation clockwise, and then one card face up to himself.

Another round of cards is then dealt face up to each player, but the dealer takes his second card face down. Thus, each player except the dealer receives two cards face up, and the dealer receives one card face up and one card face down. In some games, played with only one deck, the players' cards are dealt face down and they get to hold them. Today, however, virtually all Blackjack games feature the players' cards dealt face up on the condition that no player may touch any cards.

If a player's first two cards are an ace and a "ten-card" a picture card or 10 , giving him a count of 21 in two cards, this is a natural or "blackjack. If the dealer has a natural, he immediately collects the bets of all players who do not have naturals, but no additional amount. If the dealer and another player both have naturals, the bet of that player is a stand-off a tie , and the player takes back his chips. If the dealer's face-up card is a ten-card or an ace, he looks at his face-down card to see if the two cards make a natural.

If the face-up card is not a ten-card or an ace, he does not look at the face-down card until it is the dealer's turn to play. The player to the left goes first and must decide whether to "stand" not ask for another card or "hit" ask for another card in an attempt to get closer to a count of 21, or even hit 21 exactly.

Thus, a player may stand on the two cards originally dealt him, or he may ask the dealer for additional cards, one at a time, until he either decides to stand on the total if it is 21 or under , or goes "bust" if it is over In the latter case, the player loses and the dealer collects the bet wagered.

The dealer then turns to the next player to his left and serves him in the same manner. The combination of an ace with a card other than a ten-card is known as a "soft hand," because the player can count the ace as a 1 or 11, and either draw cards or not. For example with a "soft 17" an ace and a 6 , the total is 7 or While a count of 17 is a good hand, the player may wish to draw for a higher total. If the draw creates a bust hand by counting the ace as an 11, the player simply counts the ace as a 1 and continues playing by standing or "hitting" asking the dealer for additional cards, one at a time.

When the dealer has served every player, his face-down card is turned up. If the total is 17 or more, he must stand. If the total is 16 or under, he must take a card. He must continue to take cards until the total is 17 or more, at which point the dealer must stand. If the dealer has an ace, and counting it as 11 would bring his total to 17 or more but not over 21 , he must count the ace as 11 and stand.

The dealer's decisions, then, are automatic on all plays, whereas the player always has the option of taking one or more cards. When a player's turn comes, he can say "Hit" or can signal for a card by scratching the table with a finger or two in a motion toward himself, or he can wave his hand in the same motion that would say to someone "Come here! If a player's first two cards are of the same denomination, such as two jacks or two sixes, he may choose to treat them as two separate hands when his turn comes around.

Part 2 – Player Choices

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